First Step to New Worlds: the Voyager Legacy

First Step to New Worlds: the Voyager Legacy

Voyager 1 has entered interstellar space. The NASA spacecraft, launched on 5 September 1977, has travelled farther than anyone, or anything, in history. Its plutonium power source will stop generating electricity in about 10 years. No more messages will be sent after 2025 so both Voyager 1 and 2 will become silent ambassadors orbiting the Milky Way. Voyager 1 is on course to approach a star called AC +793888, but it will only get within two light years of it. Voyager 2 will hurtle within a light year of another star named Ross 248. With the special insight of being a major part of the Voyager mission from 1970, we discuss this unique Voyager legacy and the new understanding of the outer Solar System that it has brought us.

 

Garry Hunt

About Garry Hunt

Garry Hunt was a regular on The Sky at Night for nearly four decades, appeared on ITN space broadcasts during the Apollo era  and afterwards and continues to broadcast regularly on radio and TV. He has held appointments at universities in Britain and the US as a Professor of Atmospheric Physics and was actively involved in all the NASA planetary missions from the 1970s to the 1990s, most notably the Voyager missions to the outer planets. Among other posts, Garry is a past president of IAU Commission 16 (The Planets), the Commission on Planetary Atmospheres and their Evolution (IMAP) and a founding member of the Planetary Society. Now a successful businessman, he has been a CEO and executive director of several major companies including Logica and ICL, a non Executive Director and advisor to numerous companies and Governments, and still speaks about space exploration and climate change to schools and societies. Garry is a Freeman of the City of London, a Liveryman of the Worshipful Company of Information Technologists and has been awarded the Queen's Jubilee Medal for his work in local community, London Borough of Merton