Particle physics and the Universe

Particle physics and the Universe

Antimatter might sound like science fiction, but it’s very much science fact. We think that half the Universe was made of it at the Big Bang, although it is very rare today. Understanding why so much antimatter disappeared so quickly, to allow our matter-dominated Universe to form, is one of the biggest challenges in particle physics today. Tara Shears will describe how particle physicists explore the structure of the universe, where antimatter fits in to that picture, where the problems are in  our understanding, and how we are trying to find out more with experiments at CERN, the European laboratory for particle physics, and on the International Space Station.

 

About Tara Shears

Tara Shears is a Professor of Physics at the University of Liverpool. Her research focusses on testing aspects of the Standard Model of particle physics using the LHCb experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. Tara is particularly interested in understanding the reasons why that there is so little antimatter in the Universe. Tara has been awarded two prestigious fellowships, including one from the Royal Society, in recognition of her work and she became the first female physics professor at the University of Liverpool. During her career Tara has been very active in public engagement and she is also Chair of the STFC's Education, Training and Careers Committee.